London ambulance service failure

We were required to write a research paper on a large computer software system failure, seeking to identify the cause of the failure, and what could have been done to avoid it. The integration of software into millions of modern electromechanical devices, combined with the fallibility of its developers allows room for a wide margin of error. A careful examination of the events surrounding the incident, however, suggests that there was more to the issue than just an error in the software. Of its emergency ambulances, an average of were in service at any given time, in addition to transport ambulances, one helicopter, and a motorcycle response unit.

London ambulance service failure

LAS vehicles on the scene of an emergency incident in central London. The LAS employs a number of operational staff in different departments Resilience and Special Operations[ edit ] The Resilience and Special Operations department employs Hazardous Area Response Team paramedics who are specially equipped to deal with London ambulance service failure at height, in water, or urban search and rescue.

A Tactical Response Unit contains paramedics specially trained to work in the warm zone of active shooter incidents.

London Ambulance Service Computer Aided Dispatch (LASCAD) Failure

Control Services[ edit ] The Control Services department provides the staff to work in the Emergency Operations Centres such as call-takers and dispatchers. The Control Services department also contains the Clinical Hub which is staffed by Clinical Advisors undertaking Hear and Treat, and Clinical Team Leaders providing clinical support to frontline crews.

Medical Directorate[ edit ] The Medical Directorate provides Advanced Paramedic Practitioners in Critical Care who are specially trained to deal with critically ill patients, and who can provide interventions outside the normal scope of practice of a paramedic like mechanical ventilation and sedation.

Advanced Paramedic Practitioners in Urgent Care support the LAS aim to reduce conveyance rates by managing more patients in the home environment without the need for a hospital admission.

Emergency ambulance roles in the trust include: London ambulance service failure Paramedic Practitioner - responding to the most critically ill patients.

In the trust announced plans to recruit up to 60 more advanced paramedic practitioners, of which there were then only 15, with the intention to treat more lower acuity patients at the scene or join them up with community-led services.

Managing low acuity patients in the community with the use of Advanced Paramedic Practitioners Urgent Care. A Paramedic with additional training and equipment paired with an assistant to appropriately assess elderly fallers in a timely manner, treat as required and be able to make additional referrals to ensure patients are supported at home.

This includes transport to more appropriate facilities than an emergency department where possible. An ambulance rapid response vehicle with a registered Midwife and Paramedic with an increased ability to assess and treat on scene, as well as increased access to community services enabling mothers to stay at home where possible.

LAS will invest in knowledge and skills involving these patients, developing stronger links with hospices and review the pharmacology available to the crews to make this stage of life as comfortable and dignified as possible.

Volunteers supporting the London Ambulance Service[ edit ] Volunteers make up a small but significant proportion of front line ambulance staff that respond to emergency calls in London.

Voluntary responders vary in skill level, but their principal purpose remains the same. Importantly, the deployment of any voluntary responder will not replace the automatic allocation of a regular front line ambulance. There are two principal roles for volunteers within the London Ambulance Service.

Emergency responder - clinically trained volunteers who operate in marked response cars with blue lights and wear full service uniform, typically working double crewed and doing shifts of up to 10 hours day and night. These come from public-sector backgrounds, including policing.

Community responder - defibrillator trained St John Ambulance volunteers attending on call from their homes and responding to calls in their own car without blue lights alongside ambulances. LAS Also utilises the GoodSAM app to alert off duty trained medical persons to a nearby cardiac arrest and the location nearby Automated external defibrillators.

In addition it can deploy around fast response units in various cars, motorcycles, or bicycles. Previously a centrally funded service, this element of the LAS is now subject to an open market and is required to tender for work from primary care trusts PCTs and other NHS bodies.

As well as being contracted by a number of London hospitals and PCTs to take patients to and from their pre-arranged hospital or clinic appointments, the PTS responds to ad-hoc journey requests and provides specialist transfer facilities.

Volunteer emergency responders use a mix of Volkswagen Tiguans and Volvo V50s. As a part of the Emergency Preparedness, Resilience and Response strategy LAS also has a number of medium and heavy major incident response vehicles such as command vehicles and equipment vehicles on standby at all times around London, based on Mercedes-Benz Sprinters and IVECO trucks.

An older generation fast response unit FRU In new Mercedes Sprinter ambulances are to be introduced and 60 new Volkswagen Tiguan to be incorporated into the fast response unit fleet.

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The London Ambulance Service is investigating whether computer failure early on New Year's Day may have contributed to the death of a patient. BBC News can reveal that at least one patient. The London Ambulance Service is investigating whether computer failure early on New Year's Day may have contributed to the death of a patient. BBC News can reveal that at least one patient. Ambulance response times were delayed in London overnight after technical problems hit the control room, the ambulance service has said. It is understood the computer system crashed, so calls had.

Contracting services[ edit ] Due to an increase in demand, the LAS has used private ambulance companies, including some charities, to provide additional everyday operational cover.

This is largely to ensure set response targets are met and so that the level of resources available to the service stays at a safe level. The future of private ambulances within the LAS is unclear. Difficulties and criticisms[ edit ] Inthe LAS faced funding difficulties and an increase in the volume of callsand it was criticised for poor performance in its response times.

The service was sued for negligence in the case of Kent v Griffiths. The chief executive at the time, Michael Honey, left his post after talks with other members of LAS management. The service took the step of urging the public to find other means of transport to hospital for anyone suffering non-life-threatening injuries.

London ambulance service failure

These calls will be triaged by a call handler and either referred to NHS or given telephone advice by a paramedic. In only 64 per cent of category A patients were reached within eight minutes and it is hoped that by this measure there will be an improved response to the most urgent calls.

This has reduced the average waiting time for handover from ambulance to hospital staff by seconds, though the average journey time has increased by 27 seconds. Help has only been requested previously in respect of events like the Olympics or the bombings.

The service has more than vacancies and has had problems recruiting people. It is failing to reach its response targets. The report noted that the trust needed to focus on ensuring safe staffing levels of the control room, diversity amongst staff and improvements in management of mental health.The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is a NHS ambulance services trust that is responsible for answering and responding to urgent and emergency medical situations within London.

The service responds to and phone calls, providing triage and advice to enable an appropriate level of response.

Computerized systems can help, or hurt. In the case of the London Ambulance Service, it definitely hurt. Ambulance response times were delayed in London overnight after technical problems hit the control room, the ambulance service has said. It is understood the computer system crashed, so calls had.

The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is an NHS Trust that provides emergency ambulance service to the whole of the London area (approx square miles).

Similar to other public sector organisations, the LAS exhibits significant socio-. Abstract.

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This paper goes beyond a simple glance at the immediate results of the failure of the London Ambulance Service’s computer aided dispatch system and explores the sequence of events leading up to the incident in attempt to determine professional responsibility and how the project might have benefited from a more formal specification of the software system.

The London Ambulance Service is investigating whether computer failure early on New Year's Day may have contributed to the death of a patient. BBC News can reveal that at least one patient.

Ambulance system failure 'might have led to patient death' - BBC News